Commentary

 By C. Douglas Golden  February 4, 2022 at 3:36pm

Happy Black History Month. Your kindergartner might be getting handed woke worksheets about “disrupting the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure!”

Yes, in some classrooms, things are a bit different than the old days when we’d learn about the civil rights movement, Martin Luther King Jr. or Malcolm X. Now, kids from coast to coast will be taking part in the Black Lives Matter at School Week of Action, which teaches kids from kindergarten to high school from the “13 guiding principles of the BLM movement.”

Despite the fact the phrase “Black Lives Matter” has vague connotations and general acceptance, the Black Lives Matter activist framework is a different thing entirely. (This is something we’ve noted frequently here at The Western Journal — and we’ll continue to bring readers the truth about the Black Lives Matter movement. You can help us by subscribing.)

The activist framework is based around the 13 guiding principles, many of which are openly Marxist in origin. Some are just activist buzzwords: “Diversity,” “Empathy,” “Globalism.” Others are more divisive in nature: “Queer Affirming,” “Trans Affirming,” “Restorative Justice.”

And then there’s the most problematic: No. 11, “Black Villages.” Sounds harmless enough until you get to the part about “disruption of the Western nuclear family dynamics and a return to the ‘collective village’ that takes care of each other.”

Those 13 points were set to be taught to students between Jan. 31 and Feb. 4, according to a “starter kit” one can find at the Black Lives Matter at School website. (Thursday is when kids were supposed to be learning about dismantling that pesky “Western-prescribed nuclear family structure,” if you were curious.)

The “starter kit” also noted this year’s Black Lives Matter at School program would focus on four things: ending zero-tolerance discipline, hiring more black teachers, mandating black history and ethnic studies in the curriculum for all grades and funding “counselors not cops.”

That’s probably difficult to teach to the young’uns, so Laleña Garcia — a New York City kindergarten teacher and the author of a children’s book about the 13 principles, according to National Review — offers some “age-appropriate language so that our students or children can grasp the concepts” in the starter kit.

On restorative justice: “We know that if you knock down someone’s block building, you have to help them rebuild it, you can’t just say, ‘Sorry,’ and walk away. Another way to say that is restorative justice, and it’s the idea that we have to help people when something happens to them, even if it was by accident.”

Do you support Black Lives Matter?

In other words, the concepts of equity and reparations have been put into reductionist appeals to emotion so they can be pitched to your first-grader. Nice work.

On transgender affirmation: “Everybody has the right to choose their own gender by listening to their own heart and mind. Everyone gets to choose if they are a girl or a boy or both or neither or something else, and no one else gets to choose for them.” Because kids getting this pitch are too young for biology class, apparently.

And that nettlesome “black villages” point? “There are lots of different kinds of families; what makes a family is that it’s people who take care of each other; those people might be related, or maybe they choose to be family together and to take care of each other. Sometimes, when it’s lots of families together, it can be called a village.”

Well, that’s burying the lede. One almost wishes she would have gone Seussian: “I will disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure after school / I will disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure because it’s cool / I will disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure because it’s trendy / And then I’ll go read some Ibram X. Kendi.”

Conservative nonprofit Parents Defending Education reported in a Thursday news release that schools in Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin were confirmed to be participants in the program.

At Scott Middle School in Hammond, Indiana, there was a BLM at School Week coloring contest, for instance:

It brought us such joy to see so many students and classrooms coming down to pick up coloring and journaling sheets 🙌🏽@SMSHammond @SCHK12 @ARodriguezJ5 @CounselorDudzik @Eclipse_22 #BLMatSchool #scchat #antiracistSC #BlackHistoryMonth pic.twitter.com/akhLpg3nSa

— Counselor McNeiley (@LMcneiley) February 2, 2022

The school said “all participants will receive a prize!” Not sure if that counts as a participation trophy or “restorative justice” for lousy artists, but there you go.

Speaking of prizes, Centennial Elementary School in Denver receives the coveted Western Journal “Staying on Brand” award for February. The school’s kindergarten and first-grade teams expressed their excitement about participating in Black Lives Matter at School Week, according to Parents Defending Education. If that name sounds familiar, you may remember the folks there for this memorable sign:

Friday, we filed an Office for Civil Rights complaint against Centennial Elementary School in Denver for discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin in programs or activities. Below is the school’s message board advertising “Families of Color Playground Night.” pic.twitter.com/DI5wy3ueI6

— Parents Defending Education (@DefendingEd) December 20, 2021

Disrupt the Western-Prescribed Nuclear Family Structure Playground Night is scheduled for Feb. 30, 5 p.m.

In Boston, meanwhile, a leaked document from the Boston Teachers Union says they’ve “compiled a list of movies for each grade band that we’ve matched to the 13 guiding principles of the BLM movement” with an essay contest on the principles paired to each movie. The films range from “The Princess and the Frog” for young students all the way to “Judas and the Black Messiah” — a hagiography of Black Panther leader Fred Hampton — for older high-schoolers.

There’s a massive difference between #BlackLivesMater and the Black Lives Matter activist framework — and parents need to be aware the latter is poisonous, divisive and it is working its way into our schools.

This isn’t about blacking out your Facebook profile after George Floyd’s death to “center voices of color,” nor is it about showing up for a protest or buying “White Fragility” from a black-owned bookstore. It has nothing to do with the tautological three-word throwaway phrase “Black Lives Matter.” This is an activist movement with real designs on indoctrinating your kids in a 13-point agenda marinated in Marxist ideology.

And make no mistake: Their efforts are working. Black Lives Matter at School has been endorsed by the National Education Association and teachers’ unions in some of America’s biggest cities, including Chicago, New York City and Seattle. If you think that’s where it stops, think again.

C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he’s written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014.

C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he’s written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).

Birthplace

Morristown, New Jersey

Education

Catholic University of America

Languages Spoken

English, Spanish

Topics of Expertise

American Politics, World Politics, Culture

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